SnapChat is now the #3 social app among millennials with 32.9 per cent penetration on these young users’ mobile phones, trailing only Instagram (43.1 per cent) and Facebook (75.6 per cent).
(comScore:2014)
pewresearch:

Worldwide, the number of people 65 and older is projected to triple by mid-century, from 531 million in 2010 to 1.5 billion in 2050. In the U.S., the population of seniors is expected to slightly more than double, from 41 to 86 million.
See more projections for the global population in 2050.

pewresearch:

Worldwide, the number of people 65 and older is projected to triple by mid-century, from 531 million in 2010 to 1.5 billion in 2050. In the U.S., the population of seniors is expected to slightly more than double, from 41 to 86 million.

See more projections for the global population in 2050.

Nicholas Felton: A Quantified Life | The New York Times

Who are you? Where are you? We know, do you?

(via: keithwj)

OMOTE / REAL-TIME FACE TRACKING & PROJECTION MAPPING.

Every status update you read on Facebook, every tweet or text message you get from a friend, is competing for resources in your brain with important things…

NY Times: Hit the reset button in your brain

Some stats from the article: 

According to a 2011 study, on a typical day, we take in the equivalent of about 174 newspapers’ worth of information, five times as much as we did in 1986. As the world’s 21,274 television stations produce some 85,000 hours of original programming every day (by 2003 figures), we watch an average of five hours of television per day. For every hour of YouTube video you watch, there are 5,999 hours of new video just posted!

Consumer Insights: The Music Experience in 2014

Today, music is as emotionally relevant as ever – and consumers have a myriad of ways to experience it, from streaming and downloading to live concerts and more. Thanks to social media, fans also have unprecedented access to their favorite artists. Given these changes in the music landscape, the Music Group, which includes MTV, VH1 and CMT, conducted research into the “Music Experience,” taking a deep look into the ever-evolving process of discovering and obtaining music among teens, 20- and 30-somethings, as well as what the fan-music-artist connection looks like in 2014. 

Summary of the key findings.

Lozenges of Light

Exactly what I need right now…

louisepotter:

I love these sunshine capsules by Vaulot&Dyèvre. You can even pick where your dose of vitamin c comes from - choices range from Haiti to Bora Bora.

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letsgoforahike:

Let’s Go For A Hike

Privacy in Perspective

Only a few years ago, conventional wisdom held privacy to be an outdated concept that had no place in a digital world. However, as has become very clear in recent months, privacy has made a comeback, albeit in somewhat altered form, and it is now more important than ever.

In order to investigate what the changing definition of privacy means for marketers, Contagious teamed up with global insight and brand consultancy Flamingo to conduct qualitative research across the US and the UK.

Contagious also worked with research partner James Kennedy to conduct quantitative research of a nationally-representative sample of 2,000 people in the US, and the UK.  

A full report, ‘Privacy in Perspective’, is available to Contagious subscribers, however a summary of the key research findings can be found here.

Interesting aspect regarding the definition of ‘privacy’:

Privacy manifests itself over a spectrum – it is about freedom, control and choice

People realize that their data is co-owned, that once something is shared it is out of their control. There is a desire to create and connect but they have increasingly little choice over how it gets shared and distributed. The balance of power is unequal. The dilemma is: how do you become secure without abandoning the internet? Therefore privacy means: freedom, choice, and control. Freedom to create and consume what I please, choice to share it (or not) as I please and only with whom I intend, and control over how it lives on.

• We’ve become accustomed to our every move being tracked, and no longer expect anonymity: Only 35% of people in the UK and 28% in the US expect that it is realistic for any information about themselves online to remain completely anonymous.

• As one millennial in the qualitative research put it: ‘I have to accept being tracked online: shopping, emails, social media etc. It’s never going to change and will probably only increase.’

• The fact that we’re used to our information being tracked, doesn’t mean we like it. 49% of respondents in the UK and 57% in the US say that protecting their online privacy is something they invest time and money in.

• People also have very different privacy expectations in different contexts. ‘I think there’s a big difference in terms of the expectation of privacy between Netflix and Gmail,’ explained one Gen X male we interviewed as part of our research. ‘Obviously it makes sense to me that Netflix is going to have a record of what DVDs I’ve watched. But it is off-putting to see a targeted ad based on an email I have sent — it makes me think my email is being read by someone.’

Six lessons from the 2014 World Cup for marketers | News | Marketing Week